Ah… Acceptance…

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I often think.  Those three words and what followed changed everything for me…  I read what I had written every day for weeks and weeks.  Each time I absorbed the meaning of what I read deeper and deeper until I finally understood how magical acceptance is.

I no longer just quasi coped, I no longer allowed my disability to consume me, control me or define me.  I stopped making believe.  I stopped letting the noise of disability and what I grieved for in left behind thoughts beat me up.  I moved away from the place where I was rudely introduced to disability and placed myself into the promise of the day.  I no longer felt trapped in those moments, moments that gripped me in fear, anxiety, and loss of purpose.  I released the trap, stepped out and began anew.

I began to control the changes I was going through rather than let those changes control me.  I discovered unique, yet effective ways to maneuver through my environment.  It wasn’t perfect by any means, but it was a whole lot less noisy when I didn’t think so hard about it.  I just moved within what was right in front of me and took control.

I developed an even more personal form of physical therapy, one that incorporated my real world and not a physical therapy lab and strange equipment.  I released the anger I held and embraced… magical acceptance.  I realized the incredible value, gifts, and assets I still had and the possibilities each of those would bring to my future.  I learned that although my disability basically affected literally all aspects of my life, there were ways to compensate, my way.  I took inventory on my relationships and myself – big inventory!  I stepped away from placing value on the status I held financially, professionally and all other pre-disability statuses, I looked inward to the value of myself.  I didn’t have to compare anymore I only had to repair by using what I already had – me.  I gently moved my disability to my side and in front of me replaced it with creative possibility, courage, belief and faith.  I turned down the noise and turned up my life.

This entry was posted in Acceptance, Disability, Gentamicin, Inspiration, Motivation, Non Fiction, Oscillopsia, Ototoxicity, Perception, Physical Therapy, Rehabilitation, Self Help, Transition, Vestibular System and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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